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A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 

The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.

Read more via The New York Times.

critink:

Up in the rice terraces of the Cordillera mountain range of the Philippines live the last few tattooed women of Kalinga. Traditional tattooing is seen as archaic and painful by the younger generations of Kalingas. As an Indigenous group that has successfully fought against colonizing forces, it is losing the practice of traditional tattooing because of the changing perspective of beauty and interpretations of the practice by outside scholars.

Studies on the tradition interpreted the practice to show that men were given tattoos because of brave acts during tribal wars while the women were given tattoos just to decorate their bodies. Men who attempt to get traditional tattoos without acts of bravery are shunned by the community and are now unable to continue the practice without facing criminal charges from the government. Women are unconstrained by the same reasons but are struggling to continue the practice because of the pervasive western interpretations of aesthetics that changed the perceptions of “beauty” in Kalinga. To the women of Kalinga, the batok or the tattoo goes beyond beauty and prestige but it is symbolic of the traditional values of women’s strength and fortitude.

The traditional tattoo is an indigenous body art, an expression of the psychological dimensions of life, health, love and it defines local perceptions of existence. Sadly there is now a decline of the traditional art among indigenous women brought about by the changing perspective of the meaning of the tattoo and its stigmatized practice. It is now considered a vanishing art along with the gatekeepers of the knowledge associated with it.

The Last Tattooed Women of Kalinga by Jake Verzosa. Jake Verzosa is a freelance photographer based in Manila.

Susmita Maskey - MOUNTAINEER
Team Leader & Expedition coordinator of “First Inclusive Women Sagarmatha Expedition 2008 - Spring”
Born on November 19th 1979, in Kathmandu
Since her childhood Susmita used to love ‘climbing’. Whenever she saw ‘heights’ of soil or straw, or whatever might be, she liked to climb it and look at down. She said she wanted to see from a top what there was behind that ‘height’.
http://www.wwj.org.np/mahila/profile_susmita_maskey.html
Zoom Info
Camera
Nikon D200
ISO
400
Aperture
f/6.3
Exposure
1/30th
Focal Length
52mm

Susmita Maskey - MOUNTAINEER

Team Leader & Expedition coordinator of “First Inclusive Women Sagarmatha Expedition 2008 - Spring”

Born on November 19th 1979, in Kathmandu

Since her childhood Susmita used to love ‘climbing’. Whenever she saw ‘heights’ of soil or straw, or whatever might be, she liked to climb it and look at down. She said she wanted to see from a top what there was behind that ‘height’.

http://www.wwj.org.np/mahila/profile_susmita_maskey.html

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